[H] From Wanker to Expert Breeder
#1
From Wanker to Expert Breeder – The Dangers of The Unstable Mind !

FACT

You ALL know them, they are bored with whatever goes on in their human lives so make a decision to all of a sudden become a dog breeder. They NEVER start with simple ownership, or caring for a dog that sits in a shelter. This is not what they want. THEY REQUIRE FAME FORTUNE AND UTILISE FABRICATION to reach their goals.
Their goals are quite simple, to own dogs that they will breed and exhibit so they must obtain  however they can , dogs that are from already established successful breeding homes. These people have throughout their lives thus far displayed and realised anxiety, depression, narcissism, OCD, controlling characteristics, a need to be seen as the best (they will cheat to accomplish this goal). In essence the list is pretty much endless and we have all met them. They will always be seen with similar flawed human beings that will show the very same character flaws.

FACT

A human with character and personality flaws will transfer those to any pet they own because that pet becomes nothing more than a chattel, it is commodity not part of the family as most caring canine or feline owners view having an animal in their lives. These owners have very little compassion and appear emotionally dead at times, they have the extraordinary ability to care very little when their animals die or move to new homes. Trainers often recommend “socialization” to owners of young puppies as part of standard education and care. Most recommendations are focused on exposing the puppies to a variety of stimuli including children, novel objects and body handling. It is important to recognize that socialization outcomes are affected by more than just these experiences. Long term socialization and adult behaviour patterns can be affected by genetic influences as well as by specific experiences during multiple developmental stages including the prenatal, neonatal and early socialization periods. I know some experienced dog trainers that have been contacted by owners that bought from what they thought was an excellent breeder, what they collected at 8 weeks was a quivering wreck that clearly had some issues during socialisation within the breeders home, something was wrong. If this had been a one off then it could be accepted as a pup picking up incorrect signals for whatever reasons, but this was happening frequently from one certain UK Kennel Club Backed breeder.

FACT

As puppies make the transition to new homes around the age of eight weeks, active socialization is ongoing and new pet owners need to be educated about their role in this process. Puppies actively learn new skills such as crate training, basic commands, house training, bite inhibition, and social independence. It is important that new pet owners are supported through this process by knowledgeable and timely information from  breeders and trainers. Training methods should focus on positive reinforcement methods while avoiding or minimizing the use of punishment. Training should provide a foundation of basic obedience such as learning to “sit”, “down” and “stay” on command, and should also include other exercises to develop impulse control and teach household manners with guests and in social situations. Adolescent dogs are naturally more boisterous, impulsive and independent which means that these training exercises should be started in puppyhood and continued through the period of social maturity from one to three years of age. Because adult behaviour can be impacted during each of these “windows of opportunity” it is important that veterinary professionals and animal care providers understand these influences and can provide appropriate recommendations to breeders, trainers and pet owners during each of these periods. At NO POINT should owners HIT a puppy. People that HIT PUPPIES HIT CHILDREN without any doubts. If upon collection you pick up your puppy and go over its head, if that pup panics then it HAS been hit by its breeder and that is a recipe for immediate disaster. It is the poor experiences a pup receives in its breeding home during the first 8 to 12 weeks that will determine its behaviour in its forever home. Whatever you do, please NEVER exaggerate in a testimonial for any breeder, doing this and YES it does happen to hide reality of shameful training of pups. This gives other buyers a false trust, breeders like that should never be allowed to breed, they psychologically damage young pups and this is unacceptable. You should report findings like these to the breeding registry of that breeder, this is how we stop puppy profiteers that breed for income .

FACT

All breeds share characteristics with humans that have rendered dogs so compatible for joint working and social relationships: they have extended and extensive parental care, other family members contribute to the care and social development of offspring, they are socially mature after they are sexually mature, social systems are based in deference, and rules governing it so that signaling is often redundant, and most signaling or affirmation of signaling is non-vocal rather than vocal. Unfortunately, these similarities may lead people to under-rate subtleties of canine behavior and to anthropomorphize or anthropocentrize. For example, a dog who wags his tail may or may not be happy; a wagging tail is indicative of a willingness to interact and stiff tail whose tip is wagging is common in confident, aggressive dogs. If the dog has a problem aggression, staring at or reaching for the dog may be sufficient to trigger further agonistic behavior and frank aggression.
In the case of most aggressions and anxieties related to social maturity, the condition manifest by the dog has actually been changing because of changes in the interactive social environment. Most aggressive dogs are clinically behaviorally abnormal; the abnormality is usually progressive and is influenced by the social environment, so the signs noted by the client and clinician have been changing. We can easily understand such progressive changes in infectious and noninfectious disease, and so should be able to understand them as conditions that manifest as behavioral illness, yet regular screening for behavioral propensities is not a common part of routine veterinary examinations.

FACT

Applicability for choosing pets: Every study that has looked at "temperament" - a still poorly defined concept - has found, regardless of breed and purpose for which the dog was bred and was being raised - that between individual variability is greater than that for litters, families, and breeds. This finding should give us pause. It means that unless some fabulous or hideous trait has been deliberately selected, the behaviors of any dog are largely a manifestation of that individual dog's 'individuality.' Breed will shape the form any "normal" - and some "abnormal" behaviors will take. Accordingly, if clients need a silent dog, beagles are a poor choice. If clients live on a lake and don't want to deal with wet dogs, Labrador retrievers, Newfoundlands, et cetera are poor choices. If clients do not want to stimulate their dogs and redirect herding behaviors, border collies and Australian shepherds - particularly those from working lines - are seriously poor choices. Much information can be learned from the results of experiments conducted by the Russian geneticist Belyaev on silver foxes. Following selective breeding for behavioral traits associated with tameness and domestication, the researchers observed changes in the physical and physiological appearance as well as in the behavioral characteristics of the offspring. Behavioral changes included increases in solicitation of contact and social interaction from humans, increases in licking behavior directed towards human hands and faces, and increases in tail wagging and other care soliciting behaviors. The socialization period of the selected offspring was extended from the normal 40-45 day limit until approximately 60-65 days.1 Physical/physiological changes included a shift to twice annual reproductive cycling, drooped ears, erect tail carriage as well as changes in coat texture and color. Additional studies involving cross-fostering and cross-implantation showed that the aggression level of the offspring was primarily determined by the genetic makeup of the individual rather than by the gestational or postnatal environments and social interactions. An overview of the information gathered from several decades of research on silver foxes was recently published.2 Genetic information has also been gathered from a line of pointers affected by inbreeding and selection pressure for “nervous” traits. These dogs show excessive timidity, exaggerated startle responses, a reduction in exploratory behaviors and increased “freeze” responses in response to exposure to humans or novel stimuli.3 Enlarged adrenal glands and other physiological changes have been described in the affected dogs,4 suggesting a similar connection between behavior, genetics, and physiology as in the silver fox. Affected animals have been used in research as a model for human psychopathology. A recent review article covering additional information about the connections between genetics and behavior is available.5 A study conducted in 1985 collected opinions regarding behavioral differences between 56 breeds of dogs. While this information is based on individual opinions rather than direct behavioral observations, comparisons between various breeds suggest that some traits such as trainability or protectiveness are consistently higher or lower in some than in others.6 This suggests that breed specific genetic traits can have a significant impact on adult behavior patterns and shouldn’t be overlooked when considering the influences on social behavior in dogs. Prenatal effects The hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal (HPA) axis is a major part of the neuroendocrine system. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is released from the hypothalamus in response to stress. This triggers the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary, which leads to the release of cortisol from the adrenal cortex. Cortisol is responsible for mediating the body’s alarm response to stress. Circulating levels of cortisol exhibit a negative feedback influence on the release of both CRH and ACTH. Persistently elevated levels of cortisol are commonly associated with chronic stress or anxiety; abnormal responses of the HPA axis have been associated with a variety of pathological conditions including post traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety and irritable bowel disorder
The point is simply this - we have selected dogs to be good at jobs. Until breed fancy valued looks over performance and when we were more mercenary in our relationships with animals who co-habited with us, we also indirectly selected for dogs that were "good family dogs." That selection criterion has largely been ignored for the past 50 years, and there was never a time when a breed was developed especially to "be good with children." If clients need a risk-free dog, the best bet is a stuffed one. If clients want the closest we can currently come to a dog who was bred to be "good with children," they need to go the town square in any small town in an impoverished country and buy any of the dogs who so gratefully and quietly hang around hoping for any castoff love or food. Those dogs survive because they excel at reading human behavior and have posed no overt risks to humans. However, once that dog is removed from that environment, the dog is removed from a rule structure. American lifestyles impose a very different rule structure. Only if the new rule structure is clear, humane, and cognizant of the fact that their new dog is a cognitive, sovereign individual, will the dog retain the behaviors which the clients originally so valued.
Progress to date on research involving canine behavioral genetics: for the reasons discussed above, the field of canine behavioral genetics is both essential and painful. The vast majority of behavioral conditions are likely to be polygenic, even if they are associated with major gene effects. We can benefit in our search for genes affecting behaviors by understanding that physical and behavioral attributes co-vary (6). A cladistic analysis of tandem repeats across breeds has shown that breeds cluster genetically in a very similar manner to the way in which they cluster behaviorally (7). We need to seriously consider the ramifications of such patterns when attempting to understand behavioral changes within breeds. For example, dogs that are selected to lean further forward likely have skeletal changes and behavioral ones because being constantly forceful, as indicated by forward behaviors, is not normal. We first need to look at our artificial selection and ask if we have chosen covarying traits or behaviors that have covaried with a physical trait that are undesirable. This will define our relevant 'normal' distribution.
The key to understanding associations between behaviors and genetics - and with it the hope to doing genetic counseling or treatment - lies in our identification of phenotype. Phenotypes tend not to be diagnoses, but they can be response groups within a well-defined diagnosis. A detailed definition of phenotype for dogs with clearly heritable conditions is currently available only for selected populations of dogs suffering from related anxiety disorders, and purpose-bred groups of dogs suffering from heritable forms of anxiety (8-10). Attempts to define and to identify 'personality traits' (11) that correlate with specific behaviors are not sufficiently biologically-based to allow us to discretely define the range of phenotypes that succeed and the range that fail. Only an approach that integrates the behavioral and physiological phenotypes with the molecular and genetic ones will allow us to move beyond the constraints and either quantitative genetics or good judgment. The good news is that we now have the tools to do this, and that it is exactly this approach that is being taken in the joint Penn-UCSF Canine Behavioral Genetics project. This project focuses on breed lines within breeds where specific behavioral problems can be identified sufficiently well as phenotypes that can be mapped. This project is in its infancy and will be life-long. Anyone wishing to help or wishing more information should go to: http://www.psych.ucsf.edu/caninebehavioralgenetics/.

FACT

In general, the period from three to five weeks is characterized by rapid recovery from fearful incidents and the puppies begin to actively approach unfamiliar individuals. Nutritional and social weaning occurs between six and fourteen weeks as the mother becomes less tolerant of the puppies and encourages independence and self-sufficiency. Anecdotal reports suggest that puppies go through a “fear period” sometime between 12 and 14 weeks; this may have evolutionary advantages for the puppies but has the potential to interfere with positive socialization efforts. Observations of puppies who were isolated from humans, other dogs, or who were raised in a kennel environment until 14 weeks showed behavior patterns of anxiety, active avoidance and generalized fear.11 In addition, if a puppy is socialized appropriately, but then is isolated from three months onward, the puppy is less capable of learning new behaviors as well as decreased retention of previously learned behaviors. Active socialization should include a wide variety of experiences such as exposure to new locations, different walking surfaces, social interactions with people of all ages, genders and skin tones, social interactions with dogs of various breeds and ages, as well as introductions to novel objects and body handling exercises. It is important that owners pay attention to the quantity as well as the quality of the experiences to avoid overwhelming or creating conditioned fear responses in shy or more vulnerable puppies.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO VISIT A BREEDERS HOME , ASK QUESTIONS AND GET THEM TALKING, IF THEY ARE EVASIVE, ATTACKING OTHER BREEDERS OR THE DOGS ARE SHOWING SIGNS OF NEEDING YOUR COMPANY OR HIDING AWAY AND BEING FEARFUL THEN ASK AROUND, DON’T CONTACT BREED CLUBS MOST ARE CRAP AND WILL GIVE FALSE TRUTHS AND MISINFORMATION REGARDING BREEDERS THAT KNOW A BREED FAR MORE THAN NEWCOMES IN A BREED CLUB….

BUYERS BEWARE. BUYING PUPS IS NEVER SAFE BUT BUYING PUPS FROM INDIVIDUALS THAT BREED PURELY FOR INCOME WILL BITE YOU ON THE RUMP VERY QUICKLY.



References:

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ï 3. Wayne RK. Consequences of domestication: morphological diversity of the dog. In: The Genetics of the Dog, edited by A. Ruvinsky and J. Sampson, CABI International, New York, 2001:43-60.
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ï 11. Svartberg K (2002): Shyness-boldness predicts performance in working dogs. Appl Anim Behav Sci 79:157-174.
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